How to Help a Veteran Dealing with PTSD



Friends and loved ones have an important part in easing a veteran back to normal day-to-day life. In most cases, those who are close to the veteran will be the first to see if something is wrong. 


If you love someone who is going through post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), know that they can be treated for this condition and that you can help them get through it. Spouses, partners, family members and friends have seen this happen many times before, after doing what they could to help their loved one defeat PTSD.


Here are five ways you can make life better for a veteran with PTSD: 


1. Be ready to provide help.


First and foremost, make sure you know that no matter how hard the situation may seem, your loved one has no choice. So if you feel like they’re being so touchy or volatile, just understand where they’re coming from and don’t make it worse. If you have to do more things around the house, just do them anyway. It’s impossible to help an individual with PTSD until you yourself are prepared for it. 


2. Know what treatment options are available. 


The top two proven methods of treating PTSD are counseling and medication. More recently, researchers have significantly increased understanding of the causes of the disorder, as well as how to treat it. The more you know about the subject, the more you can help your loved one.


3. Encourage your loved one to talk with other veterans in a similar position.


Approach your local VA and ask for support via a Peer Specialist, who can help your loved one through counseling, either individually or with the family, or in group therapy sessions. A Peer Specialist is a person with a mental health condition and has been trained and certified to help other mentally challenged individuals. All you need to do is contact your local VA, and they will offer you options for your consideration.  


4. Hire a professional coach.


Yes, it’s possible to have a professional coach help your loved one through his PTSD battles, and some coaches will even do it for free. Getting a person with PTSD to speak about what they’re going through is usually hard for family members, but professionals will know exactly how to go about it. These coaches are experienced and trained such as Sof warrior foundation, so it’s no surprise that veterans with the disorder have a better chance of responding positively to treatment when they are in the hands of experts.


5. Create an environment conducive for self-help. 


Lastly, encourage the veteran to continue to practice self-care on an everyday basis. For example, download some PTSD self-help tools on their mobile phone or laptop, such as apps that provide tips for managing symptoms. Self-care gives people a feeling of being in control, and that is something these veterans need to re-learn slowly but surely.

For more information,click on this link: https://www.encyclopedia.com/history/applied-and-social-sciences-magazines/veterans-organizations.

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